Wyrtig

For gardeners with a sense of history
 

OE wyrtig, adj: Garden-like, full of plants;
On anum wyrtige hamme, Homl. Skt. ii. 30:312
.

  

Google

Home

Early gardens

Early plants

Growing heirloom plants

Garden folklore

Resources for gardeners

Site map

Contact us

 

November, Charité-sur-Loire Psalter, 
British Library Harley 2895Feburary, Charité-sur-Loire Psalter, 
British Library Harley 2895
Names for the Months

Medieval calendars and labors of the month

Medieval seasons

Anglo-Saxon names for the months

Carolingian names for the months

Roman names for the months

January, Fulda Sacramentary, Fulda, Germany

 

 
   Roman Names for the Months of the Julian Calendar

Ianuarius

January, 31 days

Named after Janus, god of beginnings and transitions -- gates, doors, passages, beginnings, endings, and time. He is usually shown with two faces, one looking to the future and the other to the past.

Februarius

February, 28 days (leap years, 29)

The name is derived from the Latin februum, purification, and refers to the purification ritual called Februa that was celebrated during the full moon on February 15 in the old lunar Roman calendar.

Martius

March, 31 days

Named for Mars, the Roman god of war, who is surprisingly also a god of agriculture. His month marked the beginning of the seasons for both planting and warfare.

Aprilis

April, 30 days

The origins of this name are uncertain. It may come from the Latin aperire, "to open," referring to the budding of trees and flowers. Or, since this month was sacred to the goddess Venus (her celebration, Veneralia, was held on April first), Aprilis may have been a form of Aphrilis, from Venus' Greek name Aphrodite (Aphros), or from her Etruscan name, Apru.

Maius

May, 31 days

Named for the Greek goddess Maia, who is associated with the Roman goddess of fertility, Bona Dea, whose festival was held in May.

Iunius

June, 30 days

Named for Juno, goddess of marriage and the wife of Jupiter, ruler of Olympus.

Quintilis, then Iulius

July, 31 days

The Roman Senate changed the name of this month from Quintilis, fifth (quinque) month, to Iulius to honor Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth.

Sextilis, then Augustus

August, 31 days

Called Sextilis, sixth (sex) month, in the original Roman calendar, in 8 BC it was renamed in honor of Caesar Augustus, who chose this month because it was during August that he won several of his greatest victories.

September

30 days

The seventh (septem) of ten months on the old Roman calendar. After a calendar reform that added January and February, September became the ninth month.

October

31 days

The eighth (octo) month in the old Roman calendar.

November

30 days

The ninth (novem) month of the ancient Roman calendar.

December

31 days

The tenth (decem) month of the year in the Roman calendar.

July, Salzburg calendar, St. Peter's Abbey, Austria
 

 
 Carolingian Names for the Months

Wintarmanoth

January

Winter month

Hornung

February

 Antler shedding month or Mud month

Lentzinmanoth

March

Spring month

Ostarmanoth

April

Eostre month

Winnemanoth

May

Joyful month, or perhaps Winnemond, grazing moon/month

Brachmanoth

June

Weeding month (German brachen, to weed), or Brachet, Fallow month, when fallow fields were plowed

Heuvimonath

July

Hay month

Aranmanoth,

August

Field or grain month

Witumanoth

September

Vintage month

Windumemanoth

October

Windy month

Herbistmanoth

November

Harvest month

Heiligmanoth

December

Holy month

Medieval calendars and labors of the month

Medieval seasons

Anglo-Saxon names for the months

Carolingian names for the months

Roman names for the months

 

Home | Early gardens | Early plants | Growing heirloom plants | Garden folklore | Resources | Site map

 

Botanists are among those who know that, in spite of the rude shocks of life,
it is well to have lived, and to have seen the everlasting beauty of the world.
F.D. Drewitt

 

Copyright ©2015 S.E.S. Eberly
All Rights Reserved

Contact us