Wyrtig

For gardeners with a sense of history
 

OE wyrtig, adj: Garden-like, full of plants;
On anum wyrtige hamme, Homl. Skt. ii. 30:312
.

  

Google

Home

Early gardens

Early plants

Growing heirloom plants

Garden folklore

Resources for gardeners

Site map

Contact us

The plants and trees found in the Plan of St. Gall

 

 

The vegetable garden, or hortis, at St. Gall

 


 

The rectangular planting beds of this very practical vegetable garden are 60" wide -- narrow enough to permit easy cultivation from either side. Each bed is used for only one kind of plant. The names of the plants are written on the beds where they would be grown.

 

The path that runs around the outside perimeter of the garden is 45" wide, as are the paths between the beds, wide enough for gardener's wheelbarrow or cart. The center aisle is a full five feet wide, to permit two people to walk side by side.

Plants found in the hortis at St. Gall

 

Scientific name
Common name

Vegetable name found in the Plan of St. Gall

Scientific name
Common name

Vegetable name found in the Plan of St. Gall

 

Allium sativum

Garlic

Aleas

Coriandrum sativum

Coriander

Coliandrum

 

Anethum graveolens

Dill

Anetum

Lactuca spp.

Lettuce

Lactuca

 

Allium ascalonicum
Shallot

Ascalonicas

Nigella sativa
Black cumin,
Love-in-a-mist

Git

 

Allium cepa

Onion

Cepas

Papaver somniferum

Poppy

Papaver

 

Allium porrum

Leek

P[o]rros

Papaver sp.

Poppies

Magones

 

Allium sativum
Garlic

Aleas

Pastinaca sativa

Parsnip

Pestinachas

 

Anthriscus cerefolium

Chervil

Cerefolium

Petroselinum crispum

Parsley

Petrosilium

 

Apium graveolens

Celery

Apium

Raphanus sativus

Radish

Radiches

 

Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla

Chard

Betas

Satureia hortensis

Summer savory

Sataregia

 

Brassica

Cabbage

Caulas

     


The physic garden or herbularis

 

 

The physic garden, located adjacent to the House of the Physicians (in the upper left corner of the plan) measures approximately 38'  by 28'. Like the monks' vegetable garden, this garden also grows just one kind of plant in each rectangular bed. Again, the name of each plant is written on the bed where it would be grown -- and nine of the plants grown here are also grown in the "little garden" of Walafrid Strabo.

 

 

Plants found in the physic garden at St. Gall

 

Scientific name
Common name

Plant name found in the Plan of St. Gall

Scientific name
Common name

Plant name found in the Plan of St. Gall

 

Balsamita vulgarita
Costmary

Costo

Mentha pullegium
Pennyroyal

Pulegium

 

Cuminum cyminum
Cumin

Cumino

Nasturtium officinale
Watercress

Sisimbria

 

Trigonella foenum-graecum
Greek hay

Fenegreca

Rosa spp.

Rosas

 

Foeniculum vulgare
Fennel

Fenuclum

Rosmarinum officinalis
Rosemary

Rosmarino

 

Iris germanica
Iris Purple flag

Gladiola

Ruta graveolens
Rue

Ruta

 

Lilium spp.
Lily

Lilium

Salvia officinalis
Sage

Saluia

 

Levisticum officinale
Lovage

Lubestico

Satureia hortensis
Summer savory

Sata regia

 

Mentha spp.
Mint

Menta

Vigna unguiculata
Black eyed pea

Fasiolo

 


The orchard at St. Gall

 

 

The monks' orchard was also their cemetery; burial plots, each designed to hold seven interments, are interspersed among the trees. The text beside each stylized tree gives the name of the tree.

 

Trees found in the orchard at St. Gall

 

Scientific name
Common name

Tree name found in the Plan of St Gall

Scientific name
Common name

Tree name found in the Plan of St Gall

 

Castanea sativa
Chestnut

Castenarius

Pyrus spp.
Pear

Perarius

 

Corylus avellana
Hazel

Auellanarius

Prunus domestica
Plum

Prunarius

 

Cydonia oblonga
Quince

Guduniarius

Prunus dulcis
Almond

Amendalarius

 

Ficus carica
Fig

Ficus

Prunus persica
Peach

Persicus

 

Malus spp.
Apple

M[alus]

Sorbus domestica
Service tree

Sorbarius

 

Mespilus germanica

Medlar

Mispolarius

     

Morus nigra
Black mulberry

Murarius

     


Carolingian gardens

Charlemagne's Capitulare de Villis, c. 800 CE

Plants of the Capitulare

Charlemagne's estate at Asnapium, in 8th Century France

 

The Plan of St Gall, Reichenau, c. 820 CE
   The plants shown in the gardens of St. Gall

 

Walafrid Strabo's Hortulus

Imagining Walafrid's Hortulus

Medicinal uses of plants in Walafrid's Hortulus

Plants of the Hortulus

 

 

 

 

Home | Early gardens | Early plants | Growing heirloom plants | Garden folklore | Resources | Site map

 

Botanists are among those who know that, in spite of the rude shocks of life,
it is well to have lived, and to have seen the everlasting beauty of the world.
F.D. Drewitt

 

Copyright 2015 S.E.S. Eberly
All Rights Reserved

Contact us